Pitch 042

Neil Haddon

5 Mar - 4 Apr 2004

There is an inevitable moment when a new thing, be it a freshly painted surface of a wall, a new car or a shiny toy gets damaged. The damage maybe slight – a scuff here, a tear there, a small scratch from over polishing. The aspiration to surround ourselves with new things or old things made good is always tempered by the momentary disappointment of finding the first scratch. Too many scuffs and patches and it is time to discard and renew, refresh, renovate or rebuild.

 

Recent work takes this corruption of the urban industrial surface a step further. Haddon documents marks that we have made or provoked: scratches, dents and worn patches from walls, doors, floors and other surfaces around us to be used later on in painting. In the studio Haddon then re-instates the slick, seamless surface of, for example, a freshly painted wall but keeps the enlarged forms of this everyday damage. He re-composes these shapes, flipping and folding them across planes that relate back to floors and ceilings. The paints and materials are all bought off the shelf at the local hardware store – the colours are literally the colours that we see all around us but Haddon uses them in often bold and surprising combinations. His work is a kind of renovation paint job that skirts around the very marks that it should be covering. There is an inevitable moment when a new thing, be it a freshly painted surface of a wall, a new car or a shiny toy gets damaged. The damage may be slight – a scuff here, a tear there, a small scratch from overpolishing.

 

The aspiration to surround ourselves with new things or old things made good is always tempered by the momentary disappointment of finding the first scratch. Too many scuffs and patches and it is time to discard and renew, refresh, renovate or rebuild. And so Haddon renovates, not shy of using the latest colours in conjunction with these abstract accounts of our interaction with the built environment.

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